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is growing tonight. more than 200,000 protesters have filled cairo's tahrir square. they are angry with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been violent confrontations between president morsi's supporters and his opponents. >> pelley: is there any
powers. hundreds of thousands of protesters in cairo's tahrir square screamed for morsi to leave. another mass rally is planned for friday. today the cabinet meets to discuss the crisis. holly williams is in cairo with more. good morning. we saw a big escalation in these protests yesterday. what happened in tahrir square overnight and then again this morning? >> reporter: good morning. well the crowds are dispersed now but yesterday we saw scenes that were reminiscent of the egyptian revolution of two years ago. at tahrir square which you can see behind me the birth place of that revolution was carpeted in tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction. they even chanted the same slogan they chanted during the revolution the people want the downfall of the regime. this time the target of their anger is not the old dictatorship but the country's first elected president, mohamed morsi who they accuse of overreaching himself before i assuming sweeping new powers. >> egypt and the u.s. have a very important relationship. what side is the obama administration taking in this cri
against egypt's new president are intensifying. this is a live look at tahrir square, cairo. you can see the tents and people gathering there. just a short time ago state tv announced the country's highest appeals court has suspended work nationwide to protest mohamed morsi's decree. they are upset at his decree that his decision are above judicial review. >>> a san jose bus driver saves a disabled student after the bus burst into flames. a passerby snapping this photo of the bus. as you can see totally engulfed caught on fire at the sylvandale middle school. there was one child aboard strapped in an electric wheelchair. so the driver wilma acosta scooped her up and carried her out to safety. >> she did everything perfect, above and beyond, and when i asked her, what were you thinking, she said i wasn't. i was just thinking about this precious child that just had to get of the bus. >> her instincts kicked in. acosta did not want to talk on camera. nobody was injured as you can see though the bus was destroyed. they were able to get the wheelchair off and saved the wheelchair and the litt
the shootdown as a turning point in the country's ongoing and deadly civil war. >>> in egypt, cairo's tahrir square is a tinderbox as protests against president morsi continue to grow. more than 200,000 people jammed the square to demonstrate against morsi's brazen power grab. tensions are growing across egypt, and alex marquadt reports now from cairo. >> reporter: the birthplace of egypt's revolution once again ringing with calls for the downfall of a dictator. this time it's for this man, president mohamed morsi, whom america relies on to be a regional peace broker. last week he granted himself unchecked power, leading to today's bloody clashes. the crowd is chanting the same chants we heard two years ago during the revolution, except that they have substituted mubarak for morsi. egyptians toppled president hosni mubarak, a dictator who ruled for three decades. they then held a historic election, voted in the new president, and now -- >> he's like a pharoah. >> reporter: morsi's office says the move is just temporary, to sideline remnants of the mubarak era and put egypt on the right track
. yesterday in cairo, we saw scenes that were strikingly reminiscent of the egyptian revolution of nearly two years ago. tahrir square, the birthplace of the revolution, once again was carpeted by protesters. chanting the same slogan. eople want the downfall of the regime. this time, the target of their anger was egypt's first ctedcratically elected president, mohamed morsi, who they accuse of behaving like a f phara pharaoh. who want everybody who believes ing toedom of speech and freedom get today and never get back home until they release -- ntations br: violent police.rations between protesters and police. it was mostly a peaceful demonstration by people who say they will keep protesting until president morsi gives up his sweeping new powers. mohammed amer, a retired teacher, now says things are worse under morsi than they were the democr under the previous regime. it means that the president can become a dictator. presiden president morsi is not backing down. his opponents are also de determined. keepsay they will keep until tng until the president powers.p his new powers. that leaves eg
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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